Rowe’s test (anterior glenohumeral instability)

Purpose: To test if there is a presence of a transient and/or recurrent anterior subluxation of the shoulder joint causing a dead-arm syndrome (1). Patient position: Standing or Supine lying. Procedure: In Rowe’s test for shoulder instability, the patient is either in standing or lies down in the supine position. The examiner moves the affected arm into the maximum external rotation in the abduction and … Continue reading Rowe’s test (anterior glenohumeral instability)

Bony apprehension test

Purpose: To test if bony lesions are contributing to the cause of anterior instability of the glenohumeral joint (1). The bony lesions one should consider in this context are an osseous glenoid deficiency i.e., a bony bankart lesion of at least 25% of the glenoid and/or an engaging hill-sachs lesion of at least 2 cm in engagement length (1). Patient position: Sitting (1). Examiner position: … Continue reading Bony apprehension test

Crank test (glenoid labral tears)

Purpose: To detect a labral pathology (glenoid labral tears) of the shoulder joint. Patient position: Sitting or supine lying. Examiner position: Stand facing the patient’s affected side. Procedure: Abduct the patient’s arm up to 160 degrees in the scapular plane (1) and then flex the elbow joint up to 90 degrees. Apply a gentle axial load to the glenohumeral joint while internally and externally rotating … Continue reading Crank test (glenoid labral tears)

Anterior release or surprise test (anterior glenohumeral instability)

Purpose: To detect an occult anterior instability of the shoulder joint (1). Patient position: Supine lying with the affected shoulder over the edge of the examination table. Examiner position: Stand facing the patient’s affected side. Procedure: Abduct the patient’s arm up to 90 degrees while placing a posteriorly directed force on the patient’s humeral head using your hand (1). Bring the patient’s arm into the … Continue reading Anterior release or surprise test (anterior glenohumeral instability)

Jobe relocation test or Fowler’s sign (anterior glenohumeral instability)

Purpose: To detect or confirm if there is an anterior instability of the glenohumeral joint (1-3). Patient position: Supine lying. Examiner position: Stand facing the patient’s affected side. Procedure: Perform an apprehension test on the affected glenohumeral joint. At the point where the patient experiences instability or pain, apply a posteriorly directed glide to the glenohumeral joint. According to Speer et al (2), bring your … Continue reading Jobe relocation test or Fowler’s sign (anterior glenohumeral instability)