Relocation test or Fowler’s sign (anterior glenohumeral instability)

Purpose: To detect or confirm if there is an anterior instability of the glenohumeral joint (1-3). Patient position: Supine lying. Examiner position: Stand facing the patient’s affected side. Procedure: Perform an apprehension test on the affected glenohumeral joint. At the point where the patient experiences instability or pain, apply a posteriorly directed glide to the glenohumeral joint. According to Speer et al (2), bring your … Continue reading Relocation test or Fowler’s sign (anterior glenohumeral instability)

Fulcrum test (anterior glenohumeral instability)

Purpose: To test if there is an anterior instability of the glenohumeral joint (1). Patient position: Supine lying. Examiner position: Stand facing the patient’s affected side. Procedure: Gently flex the patient’s affected side elbow joint to 90 degrees and abduct the shoulder joint to 90 degrees, maintaining the humerus in neutral rotation. Gently perform lateral rotation of the patient’s affected shoulder joint until the end … Continue reading Fulcrum test (anterior glenohumeral instability)

Apprehension test (anterior glenohumeral instability)

Purpose: To test if there is an anterior instability of the glenohumeral joint (1). Patient position: Supine lying. Examiner position: Stand facing the patient’s affected side. Procedure: Grasp the elbow and wrist of the patient’s affected arm using your left and right hands respectively. Gently flex the patient’s affected side elbow joint to 90 degrees and abduct the shoulder joint to 90 degrees, maintaining the … Continue reading Apprehension test (anterior glenohumeral instability)

Anterior drawer test (anterior glenohumeral instability)

Purpose: To test if there is an anterior instability of the glenohumeral joint. Patient position: Supine lying. Examiner position: Stand facing the patient’s affected side. Procedure: Place the patient’s affected shoulder just over edge of the examination table. Assuming the patient’s left shoulder is being tested, fix the patient’s left hand in the examiner’s right axilla by adducting the examiner’s right humerus (1). The patient … Continue reading Anterior drawer test (anterior glenohumeral instability)

John Feagin test (anteroinferior glenohumeral instability)

Purpose: To test if there is an anteroinferior instability of the glenohumeral joint. Patient position: Standing or High Sitting. Examiner position: Stand facing the patient’s affected side. Procedure: Abduct the patient’s arm passively up to 90 degrees and place the distal part of the patient’s arm on your shoulder (i.e., place the patient’s forearm/wrist on the examiner’s shoulder while maintaining full elbow extension and shoulder … Continue reading John Feagin test (anteroinferior glenohumeral instability)